From what you have read in the 2 texts already, what do you think are the writers’ main attitudes to waste? Put these ideas into your own words.

Teachers could use the Hide Words Text Tools to help prompt students perhaps giving quotes with elements missing that pupils have to input. Alternatively, teachers may want to use the Jumbled Words Text Tool to unscramble possible ideas- perhaps like an anagram!

John Humphrys Lydia M. Child

Read the question below:

Q: Both of these texts are about waste. Compare the following:

  • The writers’ attitudes to waste;
  • How they get their arguments across. [10]

You must use the text to support your comments and make it clear which text you are referring to.

Looking at your notes for each text, decide on four things you’re going to talk about. They can be similarities or differences but do try to have a mix if you can.

Click on the text to highlight it and it will be carried over to the next screen.

John Humphrys Lydia M. Child

Now you have these ideas, find a snippet of evidence from the relevant text which illustrates your idea.

Highlight the text and then click 'Add to evidence'.

Once you have selected your supporting evidence, make sure you’re clear on whether they’re similar or different in their attitudes to waste.

John Humphrys Lydia M. Child
Evidence

You have the bare bones of your answer now but there’s something else to consider: HOW do the writers convey these attitudes? Are they similar or different? Think about any devices/ language features your chosen pieces of evidence include. Are these the same or different? Think about the overall tone of the piece- are they similar or different?

Type your ideas into the box below.

John Humphrys Lydia M. Child
Evidence
How the writers convey their attitudes

Look at the example paragraph. Using the highlight key – highlight the text according to the key below.

  • Correct use of comparative terms
  • Clear sense of the point
  • Clear identification of the text using the writer’s name
  • Use of textual evidence to support ideas
  • Writer’s method considered with apt subject terminology

Both writers agree that wasting food is unnecessary and wrong. Humphrys states we Brits throw away “edible food that has merely passed its sell by date on the supermarket shelves.” Child says: “the true economy of housekeeping is simply the art of gathering up all the fragments, so that nothing be lost.” In Humphrys' article, his tone of sarcasm with the adverb ‘merely’ implies he thinks it’s wrong to throw away ‘edible food’ for this reason. Alternatively, Child uses a more serious tone to convey the fact she believes nothing should be ‘lost’.

Both writers agree that wasting food is unnecessary and wrong. Humphrys states we Brits throw away “edible food that has merely passed its sell by date on the supermarket shelves.” Child says: “the true economy of housekeeping is simply the art of gathering up all the fragments, so that nothing be lost.” In Humphrys' article, his tone of sarcasm with the adverb ‘merely’ implies he thinks it’s wrong to throw away ‘edible food’ for this reason. Alternatively, Child uses a more serious tone to convey the fact she believes nothing should be ‘lost’.

Using the example as a starting point and model, write your own answer trying to make 4 comparisons.

Then use the mark scheme to mark your answer.

Q: Both of these texts are about waste. Compare the following:

  • The writers’ attitudes to waste;
  • How they get across their arguments. [10]

Both writers agree that wasting food is unnecessary and wrong. Humphrys states we Brits throw away “edible food that has merely passed its sell by date on the supermarket shelves.” Child says: “the true economy of housekeeping is simply the art of gathering up all the fragments, so that nothing be lost.” In Humphrys' article, his tone of sarcasm with the adverb ‘merely’ implies he thinks it’s wrong to throw away ‘edible food’ for this reason. Alternatively, Child uses a more serious tone to convey the fact she believes nothing should be ‘lost’.

This question tests the ability to compare writers’ ideas and perspectives, as well as how these are conveyed, across the two texts.

Give 0 marks for responses where there is nothing worthy of credit.

Give 1-2 marks to those who identify basic similarities and / or differences, e.g. both of them think that wasting food is wrong.

Give 3-4 marks to those who identify and give a straightforward description of some of the main similarities and differences, e.g. both of them think that wasting food is wrong but Child gives practical advice and Humphrys doesn’t.

Give 5-6 marks to those who identify similarities and differences and make some comparisons, commenting on how they are conveyed, e.g. both of the writers talk about specific examples of how to reduce waste; Child claims that “Nothing should be thrown away” and Humphrys half-jokingly says he is going to pick up some “horse manure” for his vegetables as “it would be such a waste to leave it there to be squashed by a car”.

Give 7-8 marks to those who make detailed comparisons, with valid comments on how they are conveyed, e.g. Child uses imperatives such as “Buy merely enough to get along with” to instruct the reader whereas Humphrys’ style is to emotionally affect the reader into agreeing with his views, “Some of us might cluck a little over the wickedness of a world in which we waste food while Ethiopian children starve”.

Give 9-10 marks to those who make comparisons that are sustained and detailed, showing clear understanding of how they are conveyed, e.g. Both writers challenge the commonly held view that economy is to be frowned upon. Humphrys is inflammatory in the language he uses in presenting these views: “if we can afford to waste things, then why the hell shouldn’t we?”, whereas Child is more formal, yet uses powerful language to convey the strength of feeling some have: “economy is despised as a low virtue”.

In addition to the examples given above, other details candidates may explore or comment on could be:

  • Facts and figures (statistics / housekeeping detail)
  • Differing tone (Humphrys – ironic/racy/rhetorical; Child – earnest / assertive / humourless)
  • Language content (degrees of formality / informality)
  • Sense of audience (effect on language choices)
  • Anecdotal / specifics based on experience (both texts)

This is not a checklist and the question must be marked in levels of response. Look for and reward valid alternatives.

Based on the activities you have completed, create a checklist of what a successful AO4 question requires.

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